Woman Used a Commercial Will Instead of a Lawyer

The Florida Bar News edition from June 1, 2014 features an article about a woman who chose to use a commercial or generic will instead of working with a lawyer to prepare a specific will for her needs.

In this case the commercial will form saved her some money in preparing the document.  But it cost her family much more in litigating the will that the initial lawyer would have been.  The problem experienced by this woman could have been easily avoided by addressing all the necessary items in the will had she chosen to use an attorney.  This is not an uncommon story.

Read the article here:  The Case of the not-so-simple will, page 16, The Florida Bar News, June 1, 2014.

Call the office to schedule a free consultation and discuss your testamentary documents with an attorney.

Florida Tech Presents: Tomorrow's Lawyers

As written by Florida Tech’s School of Arts and Communication:

Second Annual Lecture in Law

Patricia D. White, Dean & Professor of Law at the University of Miami School of Law, presenting “Tomorrow’s Lawyers”

Thursday, September 26, 2013 in the John and Martha Hartley Room, 2nd Floor, Denius Student Center

  • 5:00 PM Late Registration & Check In
  • 5:15 PM Reception
  • 6:00 PM Lecture

Call (321) 674-8382 or email pdpregistration@fit.edu to register.  More information available on FIT’s website.

Law schools have been under attack in the popular press and the legal profession is changing in many ways. The traditional funding models for education are becoming increasingly problematic. Join Miami Law’s dean, Patricia D. White, as she addresses these issues and shares her vision for legal education and the profession. Dean White will discuss the ways in which Miami Law is anticipating the continuing effects that globalization, technology and the economy will have on the legal world.

The Agenda for the presentation is as follows:

Agenda

  • 5:00 PM  Last Minute Registration and Check In
  • 5:15 PM  Networking Reception with Light Refreshments
  • 6:00 PM  Welcome by Dr. Robert Taylor, Head, School of Arts and Communication
  • 6:05 PM  Introduction of Dean White by Brooke Goldfarb, Prelaw Mentor and Adjunct Faculty
  • 6:10: PM Dean Patricia D. White- “Tomorrow’s Lawyers”

Issues including the fact that law schools have been under attack in the popular press and the legal profession is changing in many ways are covered by Patricia D. White, law dean, University of Miami, who shares her vision for legal education and the profession. Also disscusses how Miami Law is anticipating the continuing effects globalization, technology and the economy have on the legal world, and how traditional funding models for education are becoming increasingly problematic.

  • 7:00 PM  Floor open to questions from the audience for Dean White
  • 7:15 PM  Final question for Dean White, Thank You and Closing Remarks by Brooke Goldfarb

A Bit of Legal Humor

Sometimes a lawyer just does something that catches us by surprise.  Such is a recent letter sent by N.J. attorney  Stephen B. Kaplitt in a pro bono capacity for a client that received a Cease and Desist communication from the township where the client lived.  It is highbrow humor but the meaning is certainly the shining beacon at the center of this attorney’s letter to the Township of West Orange, NJ.

A Cease and Desist communication is relatively common in business and typically serves as a request to a person or company to halt a particular action or activity and also to not resume doing that action again in the future.  A cease and desist letter can be sent by an individual or a corporation.

Many times this type of letter is used in the process of protecting (or attempting to protect) a trademark, a service mark, or other intangible asset.   You may also see this type of communication used in landlord/tenant situations or issues between neighbors.  There are some common general forms available online but before you use a generic form be sure the form you plan to use has the proper and necessary wording for your situation.

If you ever receive such a communication or think you need to send one, call me (321-631-0506) or email.  Initial consultations are always provided at no charge.

Great Day Oviedo – Seminole County Event 2012

From: Great Day in the Country

“… [This] is a huge family-oriented Arts & Crafts event hosted by the GFWC Oviedo Woman’s Club.

We have over 350 Arts & Crafts Booths, Business Booths, and Community Service Booths.  Entertainment is provided throughout the day on 2 stages.  We also have a special children’s play area and lots of food & drinks.

The event is located on the grounds of Lawton Elementary School, 151 Graham Avenue, Oviedo, FL 32765.  If you go to the intersection of Lake Jessup Avenue and Broadway (also known as S.R. 426 and Aloma), it’s impossible to miss it.

FREE parking is available at Oviedo High School, and you can ride the FREE shuttle bus to and from the show.

Shuttle Bus Details. The free shuttle bus will run continuously from 9 to 4, but if you’d like to walk, the high school is close enough to get to Great Day by foot. The bus picks up from the street that runs adjacent to the football field (King Street, look for a big sign). The bus drops/picks up at Great Day on the bus ramp of Lawton Elementary (on the east side of the cafeteria near ArtFest). It usually completes a drop-off/pick-up circuit once every 20 minutes.  The shuttle bus has room to stash strollers and wheelchairs for the ride, and it is air conditioned.

Paid Parking. Various close (and privately owned) locations around the show offer convenient parking at rates usually ranging from $5 to $10. The donations often benefit local civic groups or charities and the lots are typically roped off with signage indicating the rate and the cause.”

Defense of Marriage Act – Status


The Defense of Marriage Act was enacted in September 1996 by President Clinton.   Under DOMA, as the act is known, no U.S. state  must recognize a same-sex marriage from any other state.  In fact section 3 of the law codifies “non-recognition” of same-sex marriages for all federal purposes, such as insurance benefits for government employees, Social Security survivors’ benefits, and the filing of joint tax returns.

On May 31, 2012, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit issued a unanimous ruling on DOMA and became the first federal appellate court to rule the law unconstitutional.

To read more about the recent events regarding DOMA visit the ABA.org website for a comprehensive commentary.